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are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
environment. we may find ourselves in a different in varmint in which they will have less choice. the actuarial estimates are that the fha books of business will more than pay for themselves. what we're looking for them to do is pay for the losses we incurred when we were playing a counter-cyclical role. the phrase i always use, it is inherent to an insurance model. fha does it for a public purpose. there is a point at which -- i have had plenty of economists argue that it is not rational for us to charge today's home buyers more than it costs us to pay for the losses of the past. we had a large, traumatic, national emergency. think of it as the hurricane sandy or hurricane katrina of the housing market. maybe the public sector ought to say -- the economists say we should write the check for the treasury and we should go back to starting the future homebuyers at a price that is rational. the financing mechanism and the like. i think we should do that, with there are limits to how far you can do that. there are limits to what you can do with the pricing. when the private market co
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
does the company like mine compete in a global environment where products from china and india and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can make business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the only way to continually invest is make a profit. we are unable to invest in equipment capital accumulation increases wage growth decreases. >> there are
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
to relieve your tough migraines. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >> shannon: at first glance it may appear that the housing market is turning around. new numbers show home prices increase in major cities. but here is the catch. not all the buyers are from the u.s. chinese and more are buying more and more homes on the west and east coast. fox news correspondent william la jeunesse on the chinese factor in the u.s. housing market. >> well good news for sellers and a green light for buyers according to new data out tuesday morning. the housing market appears to have bottomed. prices are up in the majority of america's largest cities. by more than 3%. including places like atlanta. and las vegas, which have been down for years. in many areas, foreigners are fueling the fire. the national association of realtors says non-american buyers
. >> that was the process in 1986. can that happen this day? >> it feels like a different environment. i do not know, but right now we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates. it is interesting we're not fighting on the underlying principle, which is that wealthy ought to pay more in order to help us close debts and deficits, get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he won a point, was vindicated by his victory in the election, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for president. no problem on that. it is a reasonable adjustment, but may not be sufficient to reach the targets we need and it does not help us in bipartisan bargaining, reaching a deal. i hope as this negotiation -- we ought to be at the irish times -- that they will not make a fetish of marginal tax rates street if they should go up some, but do they need to go back where they work? i do not know. lots of ways to increase tax
're in a situation where the economy is not growing there are no jobs. we're facing an inflationary environment too. it is troubling, and it is just about politics, and ideology and pushing that forward no matter what without thinking -- >> what they are saying is that obama will have to give more, than entitlement cuts and spending cuts and republicans might have to acquiesce to tax hikes. lou: what is the republican party coming, monica used expression political party suicide, i don't know if that drastic but there is a defeatism i find astonishing. >> they hope to stan strong together in one message, we need a warrior that is why i'm delighted that jim demint is leaving and going to the heritage foundation, we don't have a clear champion on our issue, senator rubio does a great job but we need more out there jan the kuh cuban guy from florida. lou: i tell you, right now, i may be insulting a lot of people, but he is the most ex fisk communicate or -- effective communicate or the republican party has but he is not talking about the fiscal cliff. >> he said we have to did is not create new taxes b
on the variable you're looking at. throughout the arctic environment system. >> reporter: 97% of the ice sheet covering greenland, another record, that area losing ice five times faster now than it was in the early '90s. >> we know that melting of ice in greenland can contribute to sea level rising around the world. >> reporter: in the last two decades those levels have grown by 20%. a trend scientists say long-term could be devastating. >> most of the people around the world live in coastal areas. that's where ports are. and they are at sea level. even small changes in sea level rise can displace millions of people. >> reporter: a group that includes more than half of the u.s. population, which lives within 50 miles of the coast. jay gray, nbc news. >>> what do you think? >> for sure, the more we really need to talk about this as a global problem. but for sure, with any weather event we're in, it just does put an exclamation mark behind it. we need to do what we can do to get ahead of it. >> the pictures are certainly telling. >> right. very telling and it's only when we get those big storms,
for the disabled. a cleaner environment. safer world. you want all that, right? well, the european space agency says it's got the answer, and it's in space. cnn's aiyish reports from london. >> like an audio gps for the blind and visually impaired, the faster it ticks, you are on the right track. >> if you turn to the right side,ist the wrong way. if you go to the left side, it's the wrong way. so you find in the middle where it's very loud. there you have to go. >> reporter: satellites are used by different industries, like aviation. used in bad weather for planes and helicopters. >> the new aviation paradigm is going to be satellite navigation to be sure that aircrafts are going to be better using the airspace and the use of landing, and that there's more safe landings available at airports that don't have a lot of traffic. >> this is the european space expo. a traveling exhibition dome showing off space applications and the flagship projects of the european space program. for antonio, vice president of the european commission, space is at the center of the e.u. strategy. >> it's crucial for
of their environment, disinvestment of their local economic development. of course, i wouldn't believe what you said. you're asking the fox to watch the henhouse essentially. so there is a lot of investment in telling people, you know -- not telling them anything, right? chemicals are looked at like trade secrets, so you put tons of chemicals potentially into the water table, and you're not telling them because it could help the competition. >> look. there are real environmental challenges with fracking. they are real. they are measurable. we are getting a handle on these, but the idea that they are infecting water tables is a bit overwrought. we've had 40,000 fracked in the country. the epa has has found one example of some sort of water table activity in wyoming. even they're not sure about that one. it seems the water table -- now, a greenhouse gas effect of loose methane, that's real. in terms of water that'sle coming up, recyclable water that's coming up at brine after the process is real. we have to separate what's real from the fake ones. you know what i'm saying? >> let's do that. i think th
, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> yeah. >> you're taking more than we now consider a safe dose. >> many of these patients are here because some physicians and legislators are trying to curb washington state's prescription drug overdose problem. >> i think this is the worst manmade epidemic in history. >> dr. gary franklin is medical director for the state of washington's department of labor and industries. when is the first time this even became an issue that you had noticed? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber educ
. >> he designed the center for pain relief, he says, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber education, treatment plans called pain contracts between physicians and patients, and tracking of opioid use. if states don't follow new laws reflecting best practices and universal prautions so opioids can be used safely and effectively, this will never turn around. >> the washington state law does have its share of critics, many of whom are patients dealing with pain right n
opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galaxy s3. secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. >>> i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get
communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-drive snapshot before you switch. visit progressive.com today. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> back now with my special guests, grover norquist and robert reish. you've had a couple minutes to think about
people have gotten safe haven places. >> we're in a different environment now, unfortunately, and what it means is in the case of gaddafhi, they might as well go down with their boots on. if the choice is dying fighting for themselves or be convicted by the international criminal court, every incentive is to stay in power. >> greta: weren't there efforts to get gaddafhi a safe haven but he decided to stay until the bitter end and it was very bitter for him? >> the ainsurances aren't worth while. frequently dictators cut deals with the prosecution. it happened in chile and the president was prosecuted anyway. it leads assad to think it's better to fight to the bitter end. it's in those circumstances that the use of chemical weapons unfortunately is a realistic option. >> greta: are we like days away with syria? >> look. i predicted before that assad was close to falling, and he's had remarkable staying power. it does look this time like his situation is deteriorating rapidly which again is consistent with the idea he would get ready to use chemical weapons or at least he would try to mo
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
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all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further east, emily dickinson or further south, say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton, when we have this sense of cultural heritage, it helps to amplify the writer's own sense of being part of a
and another in control of the house, you are going to have a lot of give and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolves many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shutdown in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are ma
our schools, dealing with the environment, our perspective is absolutely essential. so you may have women in congress, a couple, but what really matters is to have women at the table so that our perspectives, our lifetime of experience can be reflected in the work we do. >> you've been at the table for a while but your influence is obviously increasing. tell me where you stand on fiscal cliff. what's going to happen here, congresswoman? >> well, i am hoping because i'm the kind of person that always worked across the aisle. in fact on my foreign-ones committee, kay granger and i have been called the odd couple, we work well together. i've spoken to hal rodgers, chairman of the appropriations committee, i'm optimist being that we can sit at the table and get these things done. comprehensive tax reform is going to take longer, but we can make sure that the middle class keeps its tax cuts. we can make sure we target some waste. you can have across-the-board cuts. we have to have a very clear plan to cut back on certain areas. we can't cut back on programs that benefit the working and t
. have a safe and secure maritime environment, good for the economy, and good for the american people n my estimation this legislation fulfills that obligation. i urge its passage today. just briefly want to thank once gren mr. lobiondo for his in-- once again mr. lobiondo for his incredible work in bringing this legislation to passage. with that i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey. mr. lobiondo: i rise in support of house resolution 825. 825 covers the coast guard through fear 2014, a level that allows the administration's requested military pay increase for fiscal year 2013 and provide for military pay increase for fiscal year 2014 at a level consistent with c.b.o.'s estimate on the rate of inflation. the bill provides funding for the coast guard of levels that will reverse the irresponsible cuts proposed by the obama administration and will ensure the service has what it needs to successful conduct its missions. the legislation includes critical provisions that will have the coast guard and its service members greater parity with
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> welcome back to "early start." britain is buzzing this morning with news that a royal baby is on the way. buckingham palace made all the rumors official yesterday announcing katherine the duchess of cambridge and wife of prince william suspecting their first child. matthew chance is live in london for us. good morning to you, matthew. i know it is all the buzz. so we know the duchess is less than 12 weeks pregnant. the royal family was forced to announce the news early after she was taken to the hospital for acute morning sickness. what's the latest on their condition? >> we have not had any updates on her actual condition. she is still in this hospital behind me in central london. she is starting her second day in bed there. she is expected to be there for the next several days with that acute morning sickness involving nausea and vomi
have to reduce the debt, we have to reduce taxes, reduce regulation, create an environment in which people can go out and create jobs and hire more workers and then we can lower the unemployment rate and this will not be an issue anymore. host: michael tanner of the cato institute, and michael bivens of the economic policy institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to
environment and creating new training camps, attract more recruits. we've seen this in yemen we've seen this in libya. we've seen it in mali. and we've seen it many coing back in iraq and syria. jenna: pay attention but also let them know we're paying at attention. great to have your expertise as always on set. jon? jon: there is horrifying crime under investigation in new york city. some new video what looks to be an argument between two men before the guy on the right pushes the other man onto the subway tracks into the path of an oncoming train. the manhunt on for the killer now in this investigation. unbelievable story. >>> plus the midterm elections only 700 days away. what the lessons of the last election tell us we can expect in 2014 and 2016. larry sabato joins us. his crystal ball is in front of him and he will be gazing into it next. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for
universities, one a competition for grant money from the u.s. environment protection agency. each student group will be awarded $15,000. san jose state's project involves researching sustainable inexpensive building components. stanford's group wants to develop a low-cost colorrennation device to -- chlorination drinking device. groups will go to washington, d.c. to present their findings and the winner of that competition gets a second grant up to $90,000. >>> local democrats are asking the president to create a new no-drilling ocean preserve in california. the proposed executive order would ban offshore drilling in a 50-mile-long area from sonoma to mend see know county. the "-- men so dino -- mendocino county. lawmakers, including senator barbara boxer, and lin wasly, are spear heading the drive -- lin wasly, are -- lynn woosley, are spearheading the program. >>> there's higher rates from the p.u.c. the city says customers will pay between $11 and $95 more than the previous hike. customers will be able to opt out and have pg&e supply their power again? the operators of the oldest repsyche --
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
of environment. i don't know, i think i need these. >> mike: but clayton, i know you do this i follow you on twitter. you look at techie stuff like she looks at boots. >> clayton: i do, but i don't impulse buy them because i research them. >> alisyn: you're different 21% of the respondents of the survey say that they do spend, they do impulse buy technology. >> clayton: i think where they get you, this is what they do, they get you, right? it's the checkout aisle. you're in home depot and have lumber on a cart and bringing the lumber up to the front and check out and suddenly a box of chicklets up there, i need some gum and kit cats. >> mike: my co-anchor in philadelphia, chanel marie jones, where she buys her socks? whole foods at a grocery store. >> clayton: she wants organic cotton. >> mike: they're hideous, horrifying. >> alisyn: impulse buy. >> mike: impulse. >> clayton: that's why the walgreen's and other stores worked so well when other stores have gone out of business, drug stores and you're there to get a prescription and you know what-- >> i didn't know we were blowing 200 a
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influence on foreign fighters and jihadists and syria. the space to positively influenced the environment is narrowing and may be closing. the establishment of the new opposition group combined with better understanding of the armed population provides a renewed opportunity for a more assertive u.s. policy. let me propose a couple of ideas. number one, first, the u.s. must lead an effort to better coordinate international support for the moderate syrian opposition. several countries over the past 20 months have provided different degrees of military political and humanitarian assistance to syrian opposition groups inside of the country. which has led to a common complaint from those in the opposition. they say that the u.s. and the international community have applied considerable pressure on the syrian opposition to called less and coordinate. yet these countries providing assistance to the opposition are sometimes not coordinated among themselves. and sometimes work at cross purposes. they want us to keep our own advice, which i think is a fair statement. a lack of international coordin
the information back. it is a little inefficient but it makes for a much happier work environment. >> how many hours are there in a mars day? >> 24 hours and 40 minutes. >> bill: so then you have to calculate that. >> what happens is your day starts 40 minutes later and it gets weird when it gets like 2:00 in the morning. >> bill: all right now we want to talk about mars. first, i have to ask you about the earlier in the week, maybe it was last week, i guess announcement dr. begel about finding ice on the polar caps of mercury. i don't get this. this is the hottest of the planets, is it not? and why do they have ice and why is our ice melting? is there something wrong with this picture? >> no, it's not. it is also one of the coldest planets because one side is almost always toward the sun. one side is always in space. you've got this dichotomy of a really hot surface and a really cold surface. >> bill: it doesn't rotate? >> it rotates about once every 90 days so one side is able to cool off very quickly because it is radi
and staff, has worked to develop 21st century learning skills in a classroom environment that fosters creativity, innovation and critical thinking. most importantly, ryan works tirelessly to help his students achieve success in the classroom. ryan devlin, thank you for your commitment to the teaching profession and congratulations. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker, and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, members, as announced earlier by congressman ralph hall, we lost a member of the texas legislature, congressman jack brooks, who proudly served his southeast texas district for 42 years after he was first elected in 1952. mr. green: ultimatelying as dean in this house of representatives and dean of our texas delegation. i knew jack brooks from his -- my days in the state legislature and he was one of my mentors when i first came to th
that creates an economic environment that puts them at risk. they immediately move -- if that is table stakes in such terms of taking care of the basis of issues -- in a move to things that have much more meaning to them that focus around jobs, wage growth, getting more disposable income into their household. you see on one level at the abstract level, debt, deficits, fiscal cliff, and then a transition into the to-do list, which is where they would like to see effort. finally, with all of this battering that people have taken during this last few years of difficult economy, we gave voters -- will go to this question in detail -- which gave them a choice, short-term, pragmatic solutions to fix the problem or long-term visionary policies that will put us on the right track interestingly enough, people are thinker -- people are thinking longer term. it is different for different groups, but generally speaking, people are looking for a longer horizon. quickly, the mood of the country, you see the red track, the wrong track. you see it is still 50% believe the country is on the long track, but yo
always on the eye of creating an environment where businesses can grow and provide great jobs and great careers going forward. i think that's the most important thing is to stay focused on what the job is at hand. >> and anything about the cup holders? >> well, you can have big cups or small cups. >> what else do you have in the car, though? internal, people like gadgets now. do they have the maps and everything like that? >> we have my lincoln touch system which is really the latest and greatest in human machine interfaces, it's really nice. you can command the vehicle with your voice. and you can do it with the swipe of your finger, of course. but probably the neat thing we have is a new push button transmission. and instead of your traditional shifter -- >> it if you're chrysler -- >> push, drive or reverse. what's neat about it, it freed up the instrument panel, the center console to be really beautiful now. because we don't have that big, clunky, shift mechanism. i think you'll find some new things. >> does it have a great democratic name? postmaster general from the '30s and '40s?
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